Extended reality for surgeon

 

AR/VR in medicine

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology that integrates digital information into the user’s real-world environment. On the other hand, virtual reality (VR) is a technology that generates highly realistic images and sounds that transport users to alternative settings. These technologies allow users to interact with digital information amplified based on the real environment and the simulation in realistic ways. AR/VR are emerging technologies with tremendous opportunities in medicine.

 

Moreover, because of advances in medical imaging technologies, X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans can now be turned into high-resolution 3D images in under a minute. Combining these technologies, surgeons can virtually fly through their patient’s brain or inner body. AR/VR technologies have the potential to offer a new approach for treatments and education in medicine. They may aid in surgical planning and patient treatment and help to explain complex medical situations to patients and their families.


We are currently focusing on augmenting surgeon’s experience in endoscopic spine surgery with AR/VR technologies. We are developing two AR/VR systems, such as an AR system that guides the best entry point of the endoscope to surgeons and an AR/VR system that visualizes extended digital information on the real-time endoscopic image for the surgeon augmentation.

Tactile display for medical information delivery

Tactile display for medical information delivery

As increasingly various medical devices are used, and robot technology and sensing technology are applied to the medical instruments, the amount of information that medical personnel must accept is gradually increasing. In the current medical environment, most of the medical information is mainly delivered by visual and auditory feedback. Tactile feedback may be used as a method for widening the acceptance of information.

As increasingly various medical devices are used, and robot technology and sensing technology are applied to the medical instruments, the amount of information that medical personnel must accept is gradually increasing.

In the current medical environment, most of the medical information is mainly delivered by visual and auditory feedback. Tactile feedback may be used as a method for widening the acceptance of information. We are now working on developing a device that can monitor the state of medical tools using tactile information. In order to deliver more detailed information with a simpler haptic device, we are studying pattern generation of haptic information including haptic illusions and its application to medical devices.